Maps And Global Warming

Global warming and climate changes are big environmental issues in the current setup. This is because there are more and more occurrences of natural disasters that are happening around the world. In the past, there are just some little ways of knowing what might happen. Even maps that guide adventurers across the seas are simple. Now, with the growing world of technology, there are more ways of determining and forecasting what might be in the future.
Such is the case for climate changes and the rising sea levels. Current development in technology has allowed some consultants and companies to be able to forecast and show possible effects of the climate change and rising sea levels. New illustrated maps have graphically shown that Australia has the risk that there will be a lot of major cities and towns that will be underwater in the future.
A climate expert has said that rising sea levels could globally disperse millions of people around the world. These new maps come from Costal Risk Australia run by NGIS, management consultants. These data is from the US’s National and Atmospheric Administration NOAA.
IT is not just in Australia that this is being watched lately. Even in the United States, there are also groups that are monitoring and checking on the effects of these climate changes. Despite the seemingly not so serious response of some Australian delegates to these illustrated maps, there are still climate scientists that warn of possible ill-effects.
Just recently, US researchers have stated that sea levels driven by global warming were on track to increase the flooding worldwide by mid-century in tropical regions. A 10-20 cm jump in the watermark (although still a conservative forecast by far) by 2050 would still double the risk of flooding in high-latitude regions.
Even major centers such as Seattle, San Francisco, Vancouver, and Los Angeles will be affected along with the European Atlantic Coast. Even Mumbai, Kochi, and Abidjan may be affected and other cities as well. Scientists have mentioned that given these illustrated maps and graphical representations, they are 95% confident that added 5-10 cm will double the risk of flooding.